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Selling a House is Major Undertaking

Where do you begin? First you’ll need to establish a big-picture view of how to prepare it. This idea book will help you do that, so you can get your home in shape to sell quickly at the best possible price (without breaking your budget).

Why: Taking the time to prepare your home before putting it on the market can help it fetch a higher price and increase buyer interest, making for a quicker sale. Taking a big-picture look at what to do to get your home ready to sell will help ensure that you make the best decisions and stay under budget.

Things to consider: It makes sense to start with the outside of your home, since that is what potential buyers will notice first. Shoot for nice landscaping, a freshly cleaned exterior, a driveway and walking path in good repair, a well-lit porch and an eye-catching front door.

Make a list early on of all of the repairs your home needs, from the tiny (change a lightbulb) to the major (new roof) before deciding what to get done. The fact is that the cost of most repairs and upgrades will not be recouped in the sale price, so focus on taking care of the minor repairs and tackle bigger projects only if you feel you must.

Remove clutter and organize what’s left. Any real estate agent or home stager will tell you that getting rid of clutter and excess personal items is essential to making your home look its best to potential buyers. Less stuff will make your space look larger, which is almost always a positive thing. Overstuffed closets and drawers signal to buyers that there is not enough storage space in the home, while neat and orderly closets help buyers envision living an organized life in your house.

If you need to get a lot of furniture and accessories out of your home while it’s on the market, think about renting a storage unit. The cost could be worth it if it means your house shows better and sells faster (and hopefully for more money).

Who to hire: The pros you’ll hire to help prep your home for sale will depend on how much work your home needs and on how much work you plan to do yourself. Consider these:

  • Real estate agent: This is the first pro you will want to hire. Your Realtor should be able to give you an honest assessment of what your house needs to position it well on the market.
  • Handyperson: Hiring a handyperson for a single day is often enough to take care of a whole list of small repairs.
  • Electrician: Get that broken doorbell and porch light fixed, and update interior lighting.
  • Cleaning service: Getting your house sparkling clean is a low-cost way to make your home look its best. A professional house cleaning team can make your house shine in a single day.
  • Painter: A fresh coat of paint indoors and out is a surefire way to make your home stand out.
  • Stager: A professional home stager can help declutter your home, arrange furniture (sometimes bringing in loaner furniture) and accessories, and make paint and landscaping recommendations to get your home in top shape for a quick and profitable sale.
  • Landscape designer or gardener: Landscaping consistently makes the list of things that can influence a home sale. If you do not have a green thumb, it could be worth it to invest in pro services from someone who does.
  • Cost breakdown: Sage advice is to spend as little as possible on your home to prepare it for sale. Small changes and upgrades will give it a boost in perceived value without your having to dip too far into your savings.
  • Expect to pay $50 to $85 per hour for a handyman and $60 to $100 per hour and up for an electrician.
  • Home staging consultations (you implement most of the changes) run $150 to $500, but it can cost $2,000 and (way) up for full-service staging and furniture rentals.
  • Should you decide to rent a storage unit, expect to pay about $100 per month for a 10- by 15-foot unit.
  • House painting generally costs about $2 to $4 per square foot.

Best time to do this project: The boom time of year for home sales is summer, so it’s a good idea to set late spring or early summer as a goal date to have your home ready to sell. You can start preparing your home to sell anytime, but sooner is always better than later.

If you can, begin preparations the year before you plan to sell to give landscaping time to fill in, and to give yourself ample time to get work done. For instance, you could plant spring bulbs in the fall, take care of interior house repairs in winter and finish up the rest of your projects in spring to ready your home for its first open house in early summer.

First steps:
1.Interview and choose a real estate agent.
2.Assess your property — not just the value but also what could be done to the interior or exterior to appeal to more buyers.
3.Decide what work you are going to do yourself and what you would like a pro to do.
4.Hire a home stager. Your stager will have important input on what repairs and changes will be most worth your time and money, and which ones to skip.
5.Hire additional pros as needed, starting with a landscaper. Remember, the landscape needs time to fill in.

10 Low-Cost Tweaks to Help Your Home Sell

Put these inexpensive but invaluable fixes on your to-do list before you put your home on the market

Many homeowners won’t even consider listing their home, because they can’t afford extensive remodeling to get it ready for sale. But sometimes it’s not the major renovations that buyers notice. Consider this checklist of cheaper to-do’s before hanging that for-sale sign.

  1. Quick-clean the exterior and landscape. They don’t call it curb appeal for nothing. Check for loose or clogged gutters and broken or missing flashing materials, which help prevent leaks behind the gutters. Cut the lawn and trim the bushes. Make sure the garage doors open and close properly. Wipe down lawn furniture. Fix any dangling shutters.

    Estimated costs: Completely replacing gutters can be expensive; replacing just parts is more economical. A 10-foot gutter starts at $6; downspouts start at $8. High-end garage doors cost $1,000, but a decorative garage door hardware kit starts at $19.

  2. Make that door (and doorbell) stand out. Many homeowners don’t come in through the front door, but prospective buyers do. “While the Realtor is fiddling with the lockbox, trying to get the door open, the buyer is standing there looking around,” says stager and interior designer Deborah Goode of A Goode Start Decorating and Home Staging in Annapolis, Maryland. Fix cracked or peeling doorways with a fresh coat of paint and be sure the bell actually rings.

    Estimated costs: Exterior paints start at $30 a gallon; doorbells are $10 and up.

  3. Evaluate every entrance. It’s not just the front door that will get the once-over. “Doors offer a huge bang for the buck visually,” says Chris Neumann, director of operations for Pyramid Builders in Annapolis. Update interior doors or at least replace hinges and knobs, he suggests. “And replace any junky bifolds with double-swing or heavier solid-core doors,” he adds.

    Estimated costs: Bronze door hinges can cost $3; solid-core, unfinished pine interior doors start at $99.

  4. Look down. People walk in and wipe their feet. One of the first things they’ll notice is the condition of the floor, says Goode. Stained carpets, raggedy rugs and scratched floors are fairly easy fixes.

    Estimated costs: You can rent a carpet steam cleaner for $60; the cost of area rugs varies significantly.

  5. Select the right scent. Beware the four most dreaded words in real estate: “What is that smell?” Buyers will associate musty odors with mold damage or disrepair, so eliminate any nose agitators. Clean out litter boxes, make sure your animals are bathed, banish the kids’ stinky sports equipment to the basement or garage, and throw out that science experiment in the fridge. Find one scent (or complementing scents) you love and use it throughout the house to avoid scent overload.

    Estimated costs: Scented candles can cost $10; plug-in odor eliminators start at $17.

  6. Spot treat any blemishes. Walls are an excellent canvas, but they also clearly display age, dirt, indifference, even foundation issues. Fix any scuff marks, nail holes and paint cracks. “Remove all peeling wallpaper and repaint in neutrals to maximize the natural light,” says interior designer Jana Abel, president of J. Abel Interiors in Silver Spring, Maryland.

    Estimated costs: Spackling paste starts at $18; interior paint costs $28 a gallon and up.

  7. Have a place for everything. If buyers see that your stuff doesn’t have a home, they won’t want your home. “I always advise my clients to take out at least a third of what they have in closets,” Goode says. Make sure anything that’s not on display — shoes, coats, papers, pots, pans — is tucked away and neatly organized.

    When closet space is at a premium, repurpose other areas for storage. “Finish the garage walls and floors and add some simple storage to make the room part of the home,” says Abel.

    Estimated costs: Attractive bins and baskets cost $20 and up; basic shelving systems start at $200.

  8. Check the tracks. You may no longer notice that lopsided utensils drawer, but potential buyers will. New cabinetry may be out of the question, but fix bent drawer tracks and slides, replace dangling pulls and tighten screws and handles.

    Estimated costs: Basic rail-drawer-track kits start at $3; decorative cabinet knobs start at $4 each.

  9. Give the appliances some elbow grease. Buyers want stoves that shine, not evidence of last week’s tuna casserole. Clean the oven, refrigerator, microwave, sink and any other appliance that will be included in the purchase of the home.

    Estimated costs: Most cleaning products start at $4; elbow grease is free.

  10. Finish with finishes. Bathroom gut jobs can be pricey, but replacing finishing elements such as faucets, showerheads, towel racks and toilet paper holders can significantly brighten a room. “If you have polished chrome faucets or shower valves, you can pick up any chrome accessories and they will match, unlike satin nickel or oil-rubbed bronze,” says Abel. New shower curtains, towels and mats also will help the room look updated and clean, she adds.

    Estimated costs: Showerheads can cost $40 and up; bath towels start at $10; faucets are $70 and up.

17 Ways to Increase Your Home’s Curb Appeal

Even if you are not planning to sell your home anytime soon, a fresh and welcoming exterior is a wonderful thing to come home to each day. From front doors, house numbers and porch furnishings to color schemes, landscaping and basic repairs, this smorgasbord of ideas will hopefully inspire a few changes around your own home.

1. Add big, bold house numbers. It’s so easy to swap out house numbers, and this one thing can make a huge impact. Echo your house style in the numbers you choose — a clean sans serif font for a modern house, hand-painted tiles for a cottage, aged copper for a Prairie-style home etc.

Browse house numbers in the Products section

2. Paint the front door. A front door that pops can be hugely cheering. Read up on all of the options in Houzz’s series on choosing a front-door color.

3. Add fresh porch furniture. A pair of matching rockers, Adirondack chairs or a cozy glider is a must when you have a front porch that is visible from the street.

4. Swap out porch lighting. Try replacing tiny sconces with a big, statement-making pendant light, add recessed lighting beneath the eaves or install solar lights along the front walk.

5. Add a hot-red accent. Red has such vibrancy; a little goes a very long way. Try a bright red bench, planter or mailbox to add zing that can be seen from across the street.

6. Do some hardscaping. Built-in concrete planters, a low stone wall or new paths are all great ways to add structure to your front yard that will last for many years to come.

7. Spruce up the side yard. Camouflage an eyesore with attractive fencing, clear out weeds and lay out a neat path to the backyard.

8. Add depth with a fence. A low fence around a property not only adds a welcome boundary between a hectic street and a private space, but it also makes the front yard seem larger.

9. Replace a lawn with flowers. Dig up part or all of your front lawn and plant perennials instead for a lush landscape that sets your house apart.

10. Repair the driveway and paths. Cement, stone and pavement all can split and crack over time. Repairing or replacing damaged areas can do wonders to freshen up your home’s street view.

11.Paint the garage door. The garage takes up a lot of visual space, so it pays to make sure it looks its best.

12. Refinish the porch floor. If your porch floor has seen better days, renew it by stripping off old layers of paint and finish, and brushing on stain or paint.

12.Add a shiny new door knocker. Gorgeous hardware (plus a glossy paint job) can make even the plainest door look very classy.

14.Try a unique front door. A really eye-catching front door can be just the thing to give a plain exterior a big dose of personality. Whether it’s supersleek and modern steel or a beautifully detailed Craftsman-style door, it can set the tone for the entire house.

15. Match plantings to your house style. Let the plants and pots you choose reflect the style of your house for a cohesive look. Accent a modern home with succulents and spiky-leafed plants in simple round pots, or surround your cottage with lush beds of flowers.

16.Echo the architecture with paths. Another way to accent the style of your home is by repeating the lines of the architecture in the paths and landscaping surrounding it. Wide, angular paths echo the geometry of the modern home here.

17.Create curb appeal even in the city. When you live in the city, it can be hard to personalize your home’s exterior. Work with what you have by adding neat window planters, glossy black shutters, good lighting and clearly visible house numbers.

18. Focal door. Place the emphasis on the entrance of your home by painting your front door a contrasting color from your house — it’s the easiest and most inexpensive way to improve the exterior of your home. Bam! Instant character.

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Choosing New Cabinets? Here’s What to Know Before You Shop

Get the scoop on kitchen and bathroom cabinet materials and construction methods to understand your options
with all the options available, choosing cabinets for your kitchen or bath can be an overwhelming experience. Aesthetics aside, there are lots of factors that might not be readily apparent that will impact the cabinet’s performance and price. Understanding those factors will give you an advantage in making your selection.

There are three basic structural components to a cabinet: the box, the shelves and the drawers. Each can be constructed in a number of ways. Cabinets generally come four ways: boxed and ready to install in standard dimensions, boxed and ready to assemble, semicustom and custom.

To get a better understanding of the way cabinets are made, I visited two manufacturers: Canyon Creek Cabinet Company in Monroe, Washington, which makes semicustom units, and O.B. Williams Company in Seattle, a 125-year-old woodworking shop that builds custom cabinets.
They look just like they sound: rectangular and ready to be filled up with shelving and drawers. Boxes are typically built in one of three ways: with plywood, particleboard or MDF (medium-density fiberboard) and a base that is later covered with a finish piece called a toe kick. There are pros and cons to each of these materials.

When plywood is used, it’s typically ¾ inch thick and has a maple or birch veneer. Plywood is made from layers of wood laminated together, and has the benefit of being a fairly stable material that performs well over time and in areas with higher humidity and the chance of contact with water. The panels can be glued, nailed or screwed together, and are usually installed (as is the case with most cabinets) by screwing them into the wall. Plywood’s main downside is that it is relatively expensive.

Particleboard’s draw is its low price. Made from pressed bits of wood bound together with adhesives, particleboard can be covered with a veneer of wood or melamine, or a paper veneer printed to look like wood. The interior can be white or a wood tone.

The downside to particleboard is that it can be sensitive to moisture and is more prone to coming apart at stress points — where hardware is screwed in, for instance. Ask about how the veneer will hold up with small amounts of water (glasses not completely dried, for instance) or something more serious, like a spill that sits for a while.

Some cabinet manufacturers, like Canyon Creek, regularly have the particleboard they use tested for performance, so ask if there are different grades of material from which to select, and what you can expect in terms of durability.

MDF is also less expensive than plywood; it has a more uniform surface than particleboard. MDF is often used for paint-grade panels, rather than thinly milled solid wood, because it’s such an easily paintable material.

Manufacturers of semicustom and mass-market cabinets tend to have better/best or good/better/best options for their cabinet boxes, which may consist of one or a combination of all three materials. Custom shops tend to stick with plywood and MDF, or just plywood, for construction, because of its strength and performance.

On boxes that will have European-style doors and drawers (where the doors and drawers completely cover the box — also known as full overlay), making sure the box is completely square is essential. That can be accomplished with a clamping system, or in a custom shop by using individual clamps. This ensures that when the fasteners are installed, the box will be perfectly square.

Drawers and Shelves

Drawers and shelves are also made from particleboard, MDF or plywood, and can be assembled in a number of ways. The most common and least expensive method of drawer construction is gluing and pinning (stapling) the ends together.
A step up in cost and longevity is dovetail construction: Small pieces on the ends are routed out to key into one another, making a connection that is very difficult to dislodge.

The sides of the drawers are usually made from ½ inch of material with a bottom panel that’s ¼ inch thick. This is another place construction can vary, with thinner or thicker materials all the way around.
You can make a decision about drawers based on performance or aesthetics. Ask to see different drawer construction options so you know what you will see when you open them — on the tops and inside — and how they will look when they are extended.

What you see has a lot to do with how the cabinets are edge banded. More on that in another installment in this series.

Shelves can be installed fixed, or they can be adjustable, with pegs that fit into rows of holes on each side of the cabinet. While shelves are typically made from the same material or wood species as the rest of the cabinet box, an exception would be if the cabinet has a glass front or the shelves themselves are glass. When the interior of the cabinet is visible, making the shelves and box interior the same wood species as the face, or painting it the same color, is a common practice.

One more note on the drawers and boxes: Larger-production cabinetmakers tend to build their drawers and boxes at the same facility where all of the cabinets are assembled. Some smaller shops, including many custom cabinetmakers, send out their boxes and drawers to be built by a company that specializes in this. The box and drawer companies can build them relatively inexpensively, leaving the custom shop to focus on the parts of the cabinets that make them truly custom — the doors and drawer faces, and the millwork that finishes out the cabinets.

One final thing to think about is how the materials are made — and particularly whether they include urea-added formaldehyde, a substance known to have an impact on human health. Many manufacturers have removed urea-added formaldehyde from their manufacturing process, making the cabinets NAUF (no added urea formaldehyde) compliant. However, there is still the possibility of the material’s containing other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that will off-gas over time. And formaldehyde is a naturally occurring compound, so there may still be traces of it.

California has been a national leader in air-quality initiatives, so you may see a mention of the materials in your cabinet being CARB Phase 2 compliant. CARB is the California Air Resources Board, which has created requirements to limit VOCs in cabinets, furniture and other materials used in homes. The requirements focus specifically on plywood, particleboard and MDF. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is working on nationwide requirements based on CARB’s standards that may go into effect as early as 2014.
There are a number of claims made and opinions offered about the relative “greenness” of plywood and particleboard, and not all are manufactured in the same way. If this is an important consideration for you, you might need to do some extended research. It also means you’ll need to ask detailed questions when pricing different cabinets, to understand how they are made and with which materials.

Bottom line: Cabinet prices are wide ranging and directly correlate to materials and construction methods. Expect a basic unit to include particleboard, melamine and stapled drawers, and everything else to be an upcharge.

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Cabinet Refacing is Less Expensive

Chattanooga Cabinets can make your cabinet refacing project easy and affordable
Here’s how it works.
First, you choose a door style from one of our 9 collections and the color you want the cabinets refinished (Paint or Stain).
Second, we come to your home and measure your cabinets for an Exact Fit.
Third, we installs your custom-made solid wood doors and drawers.  The cabinet framework is finished with a wood veneer (furniture grade). 
All Doors, Drawers and Veneer are finished at the same time for a perfect match. 
Chattanooga Cabinets refacing process takes just days and there is minimal remodeling mess. And your kitchen remains functional during the entire cabinet refacing process.

What does refacing cost?

Cabinet refacing starts at around $6,000 for an average kitchen. In comparison, completely replacing old kitchen cabinets with new cabinets starts at around $16,000 for an average kitchen.

Other Cabinet Refacing Features and Benefits

  • We offer a wide selection of colors and styles
  • We can change your kitchen layout if you are adding new appliances or cabinets
  • A great way to increase the value of your home
  • All of our work comes with a 5 year guarantee
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Americans Are Turning Away From Traditional Oak Cabinets

When going out and writing estimates for clients or potential clients, I get asked all the time about two things.

Should I get my countertops done before you refinish or reface the cabinets?

The simple answer to the countertop question is that whoever can fit your schedule to install because it does not matter who goes first. The countertop professionals are extremely careful when removing and installing a countertop not to damage the cabinets in any way. Equally, the craftsmen at Chattanooga Cabinets take pride in our preparation process. We are meticulous about covering everything from floors, walls, appliances and countertops. So if you can get your countertops installed first and it fits your schedule then go ahead and get it done.

Are Oak Cabinets still in fashion?

The answer to the second question actually came from two online surveys by MasterBrand Cabinets, the largest cabinet manufacturer in North America.

According to the surveys, traditional materials and in particular Oak are losing favor with consumers. MasterBrand surveyed 2,343 individuals in 2007 to 2008 and 5,641 individuals in 2011 to 2012 on how much they spent on cabinet materials and finishes.

Oak Cabinets make up 28% of total dollars spent a decline of 20% over the past five years. In contrast, woods like Alder, Pecan, Pine and Walnut grew 44% in total dollars spent over that same period.
According to the surveys, consumers are also experimenting with bolder colors. Painted and dark-colored finishes both gained more than 40% in dollar share in the past five years.

We at Chattanooga Cabinets see this exact trend to painted cabinets happening every day. In 9 out of 10 homes with Oak cabinets we are asked to paint the cabinets. Not only do the cabinet’s look and feel brand new but it allows the client to do more updates to their kitchen. For example replace their exposed hinges for concealed soft close hinges or even build additional cabinets for a total makeover for a fraction of the cost of new cabinets. This is the best cost alternative to increasing the value of your home.

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Timeless in White

When it comes to kitchens, white is a classic choice. Whether it’s wall-to-wall or just a highlight, this color is anything but boring.

Pop In Some Color
If your existing white kitchen just needs a little pick-me-up, take a cue from designer Katie Ridder and turn to budget-friendly paint for the fix. She painted just the mullions, but not the window frame, in a cheery apple green then put a few matching pieces of green dishware on display in the glass-front …

Candice’s Take on a White Kitchen
Known for her super luxe, traditional spaces, design diva Candice Olson focused on function as well as form when designing this long galley-style kitchen for a busy family of four. She chose white wall cabinets to keep the space bright but decided on a dark stain for the island to break things up. Gray,

Beachy Chic
With a mosaic backsplash that’s reminiscent of fish scales and cheery splashes of turquoise throughout, it will come as no surprise that this kitchen is at the coast. The watery palette was inspired by unobstructed views of the Gulf visible from the adjacent family room. Although this home is used as a rental, the

Marble: The New “It” Stone
Elegant and timeless, marble kitchen countertops and backsplashes have been growing in popularity over the past few years. Unlike darker stone choices — like granite, slate or soapstone — creamy Carrara or Calacatta marble, used here, help to bounce the light around, making a white kitchen feel even 

Subdued Sophistication
As fans of her shows can attest, Sarah Richardson’s style may shift from season to season but one thing stays the same: her unerring ability to create classic, timeless spaces. This kitchen is a prime example, Sarah typically chooses bold, bright colors and fabrics with lots of pattern but she kept it simple in

Black + White = Classic Contrast
Designer Susan Anthony chose a black tile backsplash, installed in a timeless herringbone pattern, to contrast beautifully with this kitchen’s white cabinets. Black and white really are a no-fail combo; mix in a bright color using accessories, like Susan did here with the lime green tray.

Clean and Simple
A white-on-white palette is just right for this open-concept kitchen. Designer Lauren Muse chose to apply clear glass tile over white mortar and creamy Carrara marble countertops for a chic, monochromatic look.

Big City Digs
This galley-style NYC apartment kitchen proves that white cabinets can help even a tight space feel larger. Glass-front cabinets showcase favorite dishes and reflect light from the large window while an antique Persian rug provides style underfoot and a pop of pattern and color

Clean and Contemporary
A gray peninsula with waterfall-style quartz countertop provides seating space for three sleek lucite stools while partially dividing the kitchen into separate prep zones

Use Color to Break Up Space
A kitchen this large allows designers to really get creative with the layout as designer Kari Arendsen has here by wrapping the walls in white cabinets then creating a huge L-shaped island to provide prep space and a spot for the family to gather for quick meals. The island’s steely blue color helps to anchor 

Foodie-Friendly Kitchen
Pro-grade appliances and lots of high-end features, like a TV screen built into the cabinets so the homeowner can cook along with their favorite celebrity chef, make this kitchen a cook’s dream

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Painted versus Stained Cabinets

One of the biggest decisions you will make when refinishing your cabinets is whether the cabinets should be painted or stained. Here are some guidelines for each.

There are two simple rules to follow when deciding on either to paint or stain. These include:

Rule #1: Once painted, Always painted.

Chocolate with Mushroom Center Island with Chocolate Glaze Cabinets - CopyClients often ask if they can take their painted cabinets back to a stain. We tell them that it’s very difficult to get all of the paint out from the wood grain once it’s painted. Sure the cabinet can be sanded down to bare wood however paint seeps deep into the wood grain. You may think it’s all out until you apply the stain and tiny white specs appear in your cabinet. This also includes cabinets that have been “White Washed”. This technique is taking diluted white paint and wiping it onto the cabinet. Again the paint penetrates deep into the wood grain making it extremely difficult to stain.

The good news is that painted cabinets continue to grow in popularity. The primary reason is that the vast number of colors in paints versus stains. Although white cabinets are the dominate color choice there are hundreds of different white colors.

Paint manufacturers are also making paints specially formulated for cabinets that are extremely durable with alkyd resins to help with curing and solid-body conversion varnishes to provide longevity. Chattanooga Cabinets continues to look for paints and finishes that improve quality and durability.

This classic kitchen below shows how painting the main cabinets a Canvas White with an all-over mocha glazing brings out the details in the cabinets. The Chocolate Center Island that is slightly distressed provides a focal point within the kitchen and coordinates with the entire kitchen décor.

Rule #2: You can only restain darker not lighter.

English Chestnut Stain with Onyx Glaze kitchen Black China CabinetMany times when we look at stained cabinets to refinish there always seems to be some issues with water damage and just wear. In order to repair the damage often times we need to sand down past the stain to the bare wood. Once the repairs are completed we then must get the stain color back close to the original in order to avoid color differences. Unless you have the stain used originally, getting an exact match is very time consuming and very costly. To avoid any mismatching of stain color, we let the client know that in order to provide consistency throughout we will need to stain the cabinets one or two shades darker. The final results are amazing and a like new condition. The new finish will also provide years of protection.

As with paint, the manufactures of stains are continuing to develop new products. We at Chattanooga Cabinets are also diligent in looking for new product and better products on the stain and finish side to provide our clients with the very best in refinishing.

The kitchen below was originally stained natural similar to the floor color. We advised the client to provide some contrast to the floor versus a monochromatic look throughout. We stained the cabinets an English Chestnut with Onyx glazing which gave the cabinet’s depth and distinction. The focal points in the room were the Center Island and China Cabinet which were painted Onyx and slightly distressed. Chattanooga Cabinets also built-out the breakfast bar with fluted post, new corbels and baseboard. The new look significantly increased the value of the home and provided a truly updated look and feel to the kitchen.

TIP OF THE MONTH

Selling a house is a major undertaking with a lot of moving parts. Here are two MUST DO items when putting your house on the market to sell.

First, establish a big-picture view of how to get your home in shape to sell quickly and at the best possible price. Sure de-cluttering is a must and the least costly. But those needed repairs and updating will bring the biggest bang and a quick sale.

Second, hire the pros. The pros you’ll hire to help prep your home for sale will depend on how much work your home needs and on how much work you plan to do yourself.

The real estate agent is the first pro you want to hire. The realtor should be able to give you an honest assessment of what your house needs to position it well on the market.